Norrie Harman

1 February 2016

We have worked with Norrie Harman and exhibited his work for over ten years and are pleased to have received a new selection of paintings and drawings by this exciting British artist.

In 2006 we held our first solo exhibition for Norrie Harman. In her catalogue essay Justine Brooks wrote: “There is an undeniable rawness about Norrie Harman’s work. The work is dark and brooding, jaggedy and sometimes representational. Images are often left in an unfinished state: surfaces are scratched and streaked giving them a sense of urgency. And thematically Harman is not interested in niceties either. Like Francis Bacon, or German Expressionists such as Max Beckmann, he brings a grotesqueness to his work that makes it powerfully haunting, mysterious and accentuates the rawness of his technique. He is interested in displacement, people on the edge of society, the fringes, outcasts. He paints discarded places and discarded people. It is likely that the urge to confront this subject matter comes from a childhood growing up on an estate on the outskirts of Edinburgh.”

Simon Hester writes “Norrie Harman’s work reminds us that we live in a materialistic, consumer-led culture, where what is seen to have value or beauty one day, can be forsaken the next. His subject matter is a world of abandoned fairgrounds and emaciated greyhounds. Crumbling Brutalist architecture and graffiti-covered swimming pools. Then there are the people. Scarred boxers and hard dodgem boys stare impassively and yet Harman emotes their vulnerability. He asks us to look harder at his subject and thus reminds us of our shared humanity.”

View paintings and drawings by Norrie Harman.

 

dodgemboy

There is an undeniable rawness about Norrie Harmans work. The work is dark and brooding, jaggedy and sometimes representational. Images are often left in an unfinished state; surfaces are scratched and streaked giving them a sense of freshness and urgency. And thematically, Harman is not interested in niceties either. Like Francis Bacon, or German expressionists such as Max Beckmann, he brings a grotesqueness to his work that makes it powerfully haunting, mysterious and accentuates the rawness of his technique. He is interested in displacement, people on the edge of society, the fringes, outcasts. He paints discarded places and discarded people. It is likely that the urge to confront this subject matter comes from a childhood spent growing up on an estate at the outskirts of Edinburgh.

 


There is an undeniable rawness about Norrie Harmans work. The work is dark and brooding, jaggedy and sometimes representational. Images are often left in an unfinished state; surfaces are scratched and streaked giving them a sense of freshness and urgency. And thematically, Harman is not interested in niceties either. Like Francis Bacon, or German expressionists such as Max Beckmann, he brings a grotesqueness to his work that makes it powerfully haunting, mysterious and accentuates the rawness of his technique. He is interested in displacement, people on the edge of society, the fringes, outcasts. He paints discarded places and discarded people. It is likely that the urge to confront this subject matter comes from a childhood spent growing up on an estate at the outskirts of Edinburgh.
There is an undeniable rawness about Norrie Harmans work. The work is dark and brooding, jaggedy and sometimes representational. Images are often left in an unfinished state; surfaces are scratched and streaked giving them a sense of freshness and urgency. And thematically, Harman is not interested in niceties either. Like Francis Bacon, or German expressionists such as Max Beckmann, he brings a grotesqueness to his work that makes it powerfully haunting, mysterious and accentuates the rawness of his technique. He is interested in displacement, people on the edge of society, the fringes, outcasts. He paints discarded places and discarded people. It is likely that the urge to confront this subject matter comes from a childhood spent growing up on an estate at the outskirts of Edinburgh.